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Collaborative Divorce in California

There’s no question about it: Divorce is tough. However, a collaborative divorce can make things easier on you, your soon-to-be ex-spouse, and your children. What is Collaborative Divorce? The term collaborative divorce refers to the process of resolving your differences together rather than fighting things out in court. It involves negotiation (and sometimes mediation) so that both parties can walk …

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Grounds for Divorce in California

If you’re like most people, you’ve heard the term grounds for divorce—but what does that really mean, and do you really need to pinpoint a specific reason before you divorce your spouse in California? While it’s typically best to ask an attorney who practices family law in Stockton about the specifics of your own case, here’s what you need to …

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5 Divorce Finance Tips to Ensure You’re Prepared

Whether you’re thinking about filing for divorce or you’re already working on developing a parenting plan, one thing’s for certain: You need to have a financial plan in place. Most people who divorce in Stockton (and everywhere else, for that matter) notice a substantial change in circumstances, and that’s true whether they were part of a one-income or two-income household. …

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What Are the Child Support Laws in California?

Child support laws in California are different from those in other states, and the courts use a very specific set of guidelines to determine how much child support will change hands between parents. Typically, when a judge issues a custody order, he or she will also issue a child support order. For most people, it makes sense to work with …

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How to Develop a Parenting Plan During Divorce

Your attorney will guide you through the basics of divorce, from filing a petition for dissolution in the Stockton court system to negotiating a property settlement with your spouse. Some things, though, are really personal—including how you set up your parenting plan so your kids get what they need from each of you. As family law attorneys practicing in Stockton, …

Can a Lawyer Fight a Prenuptial Agreement in California?

A prenuptial agreement—typically created before a wedding date is even set—can pose serious problems for one or both sides during divorce. Whether the prenup is valid or invalid, having one can lead to more stress than you need. Most people choose to work with prenuptial agreement attorney in Stockton in each scenario because having a lawyer who understands the consequences …

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How Does a Premarital Agreement Affect Your Divorce?

Having a premarital agreement—commonly called a prenuptial agreement or prenup—can change the divorce process significantly. If you don’t have a premarital agreement in place, that doesn’t mean you won’t get a fair and equitable distribution of your marital property. California law requires divorcing couples to divide community property equally unless you have a prenuptial agreement in place. What’s a Prenup …

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Divorce and Property Settlement: 5 Tips to Negotiate With Your Spouse

When you go through a divorce in California, you’ll have to go through several steps—and one of them is creating a divorce property settlement. What is a Property Settlement in Divorce? California is a community property state. That means the property you acquire (beginning on the day you marry and ending on the day your marriage ends) is supposed to …

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The First Step in Divorce: Filing a Petition for Dissolution

Before you can begin the divorce process, which includes negotiating property division, child custody, and, in many cases, spousal support, you must first file a petition for dissolution. What is a Petition for Dissolution? A petition for dissolution is the first step in any divorce proceeding in Stockton or elsewhere in California. When your divorce lawyer files the petition, the …

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Contested Vs. Uncontested Divorce in California

Contested Vs. Uncontested Divorce in California California is a no-fault divorce state, which means that neither spouse has to prove that there was any misconduct on the part of the other.  The only requirement for a no-fault divorce is that the couple state that they cannot get along. This is referred to in the courts as “irreconcilable differences.”  However, just …